Alcohol facts and Myths

This blog post is quite simple but would blow your mind in a couple of seconds. these are some very interesting facts and Myths about alcohol, this blog was referenced from GREATIST

The Myth: Older wine is better.
Everyone has at some point in their endeavor head of this line. Even in music and not it is even more like a proverbial saying. The year on the label must mean something, right? Aged wine is perceived as more complex in flavor, more expensive, and of a higher quality. So it must be better to let any bottle sit around for a while before uncorking it.

The Fact: Do you know that Sometimes if a wine gets past it expiring date, some of them actually loses its alcohol content. It depends on the type of wine. Some are meant to be consumed within one year of production and don’t get any better after time, while others are intended to be stored in a wine cellar for a few years to reach their peak quality. Unfortunately, a wine that sits past its intended expiration date does not get any more impressive with time. In fact, wine’s antioxidant content might actually decrease as it ages.

The Myth: Mixing alcohol with energy drinks makes you drunker. Most people think mixing this two together helps you to reduce the effect of alcohol in the body. As a result, people are tricked into thinking they have more energy than they actually do, which can push them to continue drinking (and potentially lead to negative consequences such as getting too drunk or having a terrible hangover the next day)  .

The Fact: Energy drinks alter the perception of how intoxicated we really are, but have no direct effect on how those shots hit us. One exception? Mixing alcohol with diet soda may actually increase intoxication (but in this case it’s the lack of sugar, not the caffeine content, that has an effect). While for the most part drinking too much can’t be blamed solely on Red Bull, it’s best to steer clear of this combo to stay aware of your limits and to avoid any possible negative effects caused by drinking too much alcohol or too much caffeine.

The Myth: Beer before liquor, never been sicker; liquor before beer, you’re in the clear.

The reigning belief is that beer is a “softer” drink that can’t cause drunkenness as quickly as, say, shots of vodka. Switching to hard liquor after a few beers can make the feeling come on too fast… usually resulting in vomit (or so the myth goes). So, starting with the hard stuff and then slowing down with beer should prevent the spins, right? Not so much.

The Fact: The fact is the kind of drink you consume whether or not if it a beer or vodka doesn’t matter. What matters is the level of alcohol you as an individual is actually consuming. Mind you, the human body actually metabolizes alcohol differently. The average rate of body metabolism is 1000milligram of alcohol consumed per 1kg of human’s weight.

The Myth: Darker alcohols are always healthier.
Darker beers and wines generally have more antioxidants than light beer and white wine (the darker hues are thought to signify higher flavanoid content in beers and higher polyphenol content in wines). This means that most people conclude that, while these options are sometimes slightly higher in calories, they pack more nutritional value and are therefore inherently healthier than their paler friends.

The Fact: While darker alcohols may contain more antioxidants, they can also contain more cogeners—toxic chemicals created during the fermentation process—which can worsen hangovers (this goes for beer, wine, rum, whiskey, gold tequila, and pretty much any drink with a darkish hue). If you need to avoid feeling sluggish the next day, switch out some of those darker drinks for lighter versions.

The Myth: Taking Aspirin or ibuprofen before heavy drinking can reduce hangover effects.
It’s a nice thought: Taking a pill now will help prevent feeling awful in the morning. But while those preemptive efforts to stave off a thudding headache may seem wise, ultimately they don’t pay off.

The Fact: Taking painkillers before pain sets in won’t help—the med’s power will wear off before that headache comes on. A word of caution: Absolutely do not take aspirin or ibuprofen while still drinking. The painkillers can erode the stomach lining, which, coupled with the stomach irritants in alcohol, can cause liver inflammation and allow more alcohol into the bloodstream, resulting in potential liver damage and a higher-than-normal Blood Alcohol Content (Talk about counterproductive!). Taking ibuprofen or another pain reliever the morning after, however, can help relieve temporary pains.

The Myth: Eating before bed will reduce hangover.
Most of us have taken a drunken 3-am journey to the local pizza shop with a hankering for greasy, cheesy goodness. Comforting as it is, those slices will do very little to sober you up or reduce the severity of those hangover pains.

The Fact: By the time that pizza hits the stomach, the alcohol consumed has already been absorbed into your system. Greasy food won’t help your liver metabolize the alcohol any faster. In fact, the combination of alcohol and greasy food can actually contribute to acid reflux, meaning you’ll feel even worse in the morning. If you want food to help slow down alcohol absorption, consume a snack or a meal before you start drinking (But don’t take this as free license to binge-drink.).

The Myth: Coffee and a cold shower will sober you up.
Jolting and brisk: It’s easy to think that this combo will banish sleepiness and reduce the effects of alcohol, but the wake-up call treats only the symptoms—not the cause—of fatigue brought on by a late night of drinking.

The Fact: A human liver can process about one standard drink every hour (That’s 1.5 oz of hard liquor, 5 ounces of wine, or 12 ounces of beer.) Coffee or a dunk in a brisk shower might wake you up a little, but it won’t speed up the process of eliminating the bad stuff from your system. Time is (unfortunately) the only cure.

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