Veuve Cliquot: The success story

The luxury champagne’s full name is Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin, and it has been produced in Reims, France, since 1772 when it was founded by Philippe Clicquot-Muiron. His son, François, inherited the family business, but died in 1805. In French, veuve means widow, and it is his widow, Barbe-Nicole Ponsardin, who played an integral role making the Veuve Clicquot champagne an iconic brand that is internationally renowned and featured in countless pop culture movies, music, and other media. The veuve was only 27-years-old when she became the champagne widow.

Veuve Clicquot is enjoyed by family and friends all over the world – on celebratory occasions, at the start of something new, at the end of something that’s time has come, but it all started with one woman in France in the late 1700s.

However, Clicquot made splashes on the champagne scene from the start, being credited as the first champagne house to create rosé champagne. The Clicquot champagne house is also the first ever to be run by a woman.

The champagne was invented, arguably, by a French monk named Dom Pérignon, another name you probably recognize, in the seventeenth century. He combined several different varieties of grape in a special region of eastern France that tended to produce wine with a natural fizz. Legend has it that the priest who married Barbe-Nicole and François gave the couple a book by Dom Pérignon as a wedding gift. Dom Pérignon did not master the champagne, however, as his product would turn cloudy with sticky yeast that ruined the taste.

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